walnuts

Food of the Month: Lentil Walnut Meatloaf

Care of Andrea Howe of glowingongreens.com Winter is a time when we Canadians turn to hearty, warm meals, often using more canned foods. Since our climate is not capable of growing fresh produce all year round, using canned products, like lentils, is a great way to still use local products. Lentils are a nutrition-packed ingredient you should definitely be including in your diet. They are so versatile and because they have a mild flavour, they’re great in most dishes. Lentils are rich in iron, fibre, B vitamins, and a great source of plant-based protein. Just one cup of cooked lentils provides about 18g of protein. Additionally, their fibre content comes in at about 15g for 1 cup, giving you about half of your daily needs. Fibre is a nutrient most people do not get enough of. Increasing fibre in your diet can help reduce blood pressure, blood sugar levels, and the risk of developing various chronic diseases and cancer. Their B-vitamin content also makes them great for our brain. B vitamins, such as thiamine and folate aid in healthy brain development in infants, as well as the maintenance and function in adult brains. Additionally, lentils are a great source of… Read More


Filed under: elifelines Food of the Month News News from the Toronto Vegetarian Association Nutrition Uncategorised Vegan & Vegetarian Recipes

Walnut Loving Soup

Care of Laura Wright Ingredients: 2 tbsp grapeseed oil 3 leeks, white + light green parts chopped (discard green tops or use them for stock) 4 sprigs of thyme, leaves minced 1 fennel bulb, cored and chopped (reserve a few fronds for garnish) 1 medium apple, peeled, cored + chopped 1-2 tsp ground turmeric 1/2 cup walnut halves, toasted salt + pepper 4 cups vegetable stock For garneshing: maple syrup, black pepper, reserved fennel fronds, toasty walnuts Directions: Heat the grapeseed oil in a large soup pot over medium. Add the chopped leeks and thyme. Stir and sauté the leeks until they are a bit soft, about 4 minutes. Add the chopped fennel and apples. Stir everything up a bit. Add the turmeric and stir to coat all of the vegetables evenly. Sauté the vegetables until the fennel is starting to soften, another 4 minutes. Add the walnuts and stir them in. Season the whole thing with salt and pepper. Add the vegetable stock and stir. Bring the pot to a boil and simmer until all of the vegetables/apples are very soft, about 12-15 minutes. Remove the soup from the heat. Carefully blend the mixture in batches… Read More


Filed under: Eat Veg elifelines Vegan & Vegetarian Recipes

Whoop whoop for walnuts!

Care of Laura Wright My first exposure to walnuts was, sadly, as a seemingly stubborn addition to brownies. I’ve grown out of that childhood distaste and thank goodness. The taste is rich and wonderful, whether you’re eating them raw or toasted, and the health benefits are kind of insane too. They are the edible seed of their respective tree and the most common major species of walnuts are grown for their seeds exclusively–the Persian or English walnut and the black Walnut. The black walnut is grown throughout North America, as well as in Ontario, and has a wonderfully strong eucalyptus kind of flavour. For Your Mind: Walnuts have an impressive Omega-3 fatty acid content and what’s more? A solid handful will provide you with most of your daily needed intake. Our brains rely on healthy fats for their make-up, but also in terms of mood stabilization and overall activity. Solid, saturated fats rather predictably make for solid and sticky barriers to nutrient and waste flow. Omega-3 fats tend to be more fluid which makes for more optimal nutrient absorption and overall brain function. Sprinkle a few on salads, grind them into a nut butter or simply snack on… Read More


Filed under: Eat Veg elifelines Food of the Month Nutrition