cabbage

Food and Recipe of the Month: Cultured Veggies and Cabbage

Care of Amy Symington at ameliaeats.com  Cabbage is an often overlooked winter vegetable that gets very little culinary love. However, its versatility and impressive nutrition profile will surprise even your sauerkraut-loving grandmother. It is a member of the cruciferous vegetable family including arugula, broccoli, collard greens, horseradish, and kale. Cruciferous vegetables contain high levels of health-promoting phytochemicals, specifically antioxidant-rich polyphenols and disease-preventing fibre. They contain high levels of anti-bacterial organosulphur compounds that have been shown to reduce your risk of type 2 diabetes, heart disease and cancer. Cabbage is also rich in vitamins C and K, as well as manganese, all of which help to support good bone and teeth health. Use it in spring or winter rolls, slaws, salads, soups, tacos, braised with tofu, and/or fermented in sauerkraut or cultured veggies. Cultured Veggies Makes 1 500ml jar Ingredients: (Prep a few days in advance or just use veggies as toppings and omit water, garlic and salt) 1 large carrot, grated 1 small beet, grated ½ cup cabbage, thinly sliced 1 cup water 1 clove garlic ½ tsp sea salt 16 oz mason jar Directions: 1. In a large bowl… Read More


Filed under: Eat Veg elifelines Food of the Month News from the Toronto Vegetarian Association Nutrition Uncategorised Vegan & Vegetarian Recipes

Holiday Coleslaw with Orange Vinaigrette

Care of Amy Symington of ameliaeats.com Makes 5 servings, serving size: 1 cup (250ml) Ingredients Salad: 1 medium Bartlett pear, julienned 1 medium golden (or red) beet, julienned ½ small green cabbage, thinly sliced, approximately 3 cups ½ red onion, thinly sliced Dressing: 1 medium orange zested and juiced, approximately ¼ cup juice and 1 tbsp zest 3 tbsp apple cider vinegar 2 tbsp extra virgin olive oil 1 tsp djion mustard 1 tsp maple syrup ¼ tsp salt Garnish: ½ cup toasted hazelnuts, chopped 1/3 cup unsweetened cranberries 3 tbsp chopped parsley Directions In a large salad bowl, add all of the salad ingredients. In a small bowl, whisk together all dressing ingredients. Pour over salad and toss. Top with hazelnuts, cranberries, and parsley. Read More


Filed under: Eat Veg elifelines Food of the Month Front page post News Uncategorised Vegan & Vegetarian Recipes Vegetarian Holiday Recipes

Food of the Month: Cabbage

Care of Amy Symington, of ameliaeats.com Cabbages, cabbages, yum yum yum! Cabbage, a member of the cruciferous vegetable family, is a vegetable to make serious friends with. Cruciferous vegetables, in general, are full of fibre and phytochemicals, specifically sulphuric compounds that may reduce your risk of certain types of cancer, type 2 diabetes, as well as cardiovascular disease. Cabbage is also an excellent source of vitamin C and K. Although green is the most commonly consumed cabbage, red cabbage contains the antioxidant anthocyanin, which has nutritional perks such as providing anti-inflammatory benefits. In order to retain its maximum health benefits, raw, lightly steamed, or sauteed are the preferred cooking methods of cabbage. No matter how you slice it though, cabbage is one vegetable you won’t want to turn your nose up at. Read More


Filed under: Eat Veg elifelines Food of the Month Nutrition

Red Cabbage and Black Currant Salad

Makes 6 servings, care of the The New York Times     Ingredients 1 small head of red cabbage 1 1/4 cups fresh or frozen black currants or black currant jam Sugar to taste Directions 1. Julienne the cabbage or grate it into fine shreds. Place it in a clean dish towel and squeeze out any excess moisture. Transfer to a large bowl. 2. If using frozen currants, defrost them. Mash the currants and, if necessary, sweeten to taste with sugar. 3. Combine the black currant mixture (or jam) with the cabbage and toss well. Cover and refrigerate for several hours before serving. Read More


Filed under: Eat Veg elifelines Vegan & Vegetarian Recipes