Vegan & Vegetarian Recipes

Food and Recipe of the Month: Spring Mix Soup

Care of Andrea Howe, of glowingongreens.com  The weather is getting warmer and our meals are getting brighter. The transition from winter to spring means we are able to include more fresh produce as growing season is beginning. One of the earliest and quickest growing produce we have in Ontario is Spring lettuce mix. These adaptable greens can handle cooler temperatures and moist weather. They’re a perfect April ingredient. Spring lettuce mix often includes a variety of greens including, spinach, radicchio, arugula, and frisee. This variety of greens offers a range of different nutrients. The most notable ones being fibre, vitamin K, vitamin C, and antioxidants. Fibre is a powerhouse nutrient in produce with the ability to reduce risk of cancer and chronic disease, including Type 2 Diabetes and heart disease. Vitamin K is a fat-soluble vitamin that is found mostly in leafy greens. It helps with blood clotting, wound healing, and can aid in bone health. Vitamin C is also a nutrient that promotes wound healing and skin repair. This means that leafy greens are an essential ingredient for healthy skin. Finally, antioxidants are found in all fruit and vegetables. Their abundance in leafy greens is quite notable. Antioxidants… Read More


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Food and Recipe of the Month: Microgreens

Care of Andrea Howe, of Glowing On Greens Microgreens are an exciting, fairly new ingredient to add to our meals. Due to their small size, they are more concentrated, meaning they have higher levels of vitamins and antioxidants when compared to their mature, full grown counterpart. Microgreens come in different varieties, including alfalfa sprouts, broccoli shoots, amaranth, and watercress. They are a crunchy and delicious ingredient to add as a garnish, or to include in salads and sandwiches. Microgreens have become popular due to their beautiful addition to meals, and their nutrient profile. Studies of microgreen have found they have up to 40 times higher the antioxidant level compared to their more mature versions. Higher levels of antioxidants in the diet can lower the risk of many chronic diseases and cancers, including heart disease, diabetes, and Alzheimer’s disease. These crunchy greens also contain fibre, which can help to lower the risk of various diseases and cancer. Along with benefits to your health, microgreens are a fun way to add an extra element to your dish, along with added benefits to your health. Try using them as a garnish to your soup, stew, or in this Warm Sweet Potato Couscous… Read More


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Food and Recipe of the Month: Roasted Beet and Potato Salad

Care of Andrea Howe, of glowingongreens.com  Beets take the prize for the prettiest and brightest vegetable. Their bright red colour and earthy taste can be a great addition to salads, juices, or roasted on their own. Beets are a root vegetable and are generally harvested at the end of the summer and late fall. Like other root vegetables, they can be stored for many months and be a great addition to our diet in the winter months. Beets have an impressive list of nutrients that provide many benefits to our health! Their bright red colour comes from a pigment called betalain, a unique antioxidant not found in many other red fruits and vegetables. These antioxidants have been seen to have anti-inflammatory effects, and to reduce oxidation in the body. Basically, they can help fight harmful factors in our body that can lead to the development of disease. Beets are also exceptionally high in nitrates, which play a role in lowering blood pressure, enhance exercise performance, and reduce inflammation. Finally, beets are packed full of vitamin C, a powerful antioxidant that is important for immune function and skin repair. While beets contain many benefits, their antioxidant content is what is… Read More


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Food of the Month: Lentil Walnut Meatloaf

Care of Andrea Howe of glowingongreens.com Winter is a time when we Canadians turn to hearty, warm meals, often using more canned foods. Since our climate is not capable of growing fresh produce all year round, using canned products, like lentils, is a great way to still use local products. Lentils are a nutrition-packed ingredient you should definitely be including in your diet. They are so versatile and because they have a mild flavour, they’re great in most dishes. Lentils are rich in iron, fibre, B vitamins, and a great source of plant-based protein. Just one cup of cooked lentils provides about 18g of protein. Additionally, their fibre content comes in at about 15g for 1 cup, giving you about half of your daily needs. Fibre is a nutrient most people do not get enough of. Increasing fibre in your diet can help reduce blood pressure, blood sugar levels, and the risk of developing various chronic diseases and cancer. Their B-vitamin content also makes them great for our brain. B vitamins, such as thiamine and folate aid in healthy brain development in infants, as well as the maintenance and function in adult brains. Additionally, lentils are a great source of… Read More


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Food of the Month: Ginger Molasses Cookies

Care of Andrea Howe at glowingongreens.com  December is a time when we turn to warm, comforting foods. Especially in the heart of a pandemic, food is an easy thing to bring is warmth and joy. And ginger is the perfect ingredient for that. Ginger’s zingy and spicy flavour is a great ingredient to bring a dish to life, whether it’s a stew, soup, sauce, or baked good. Ginger has been used as a staple ingredient in a variety of cuisines such as Indian, Thai, Caribbean, and more. Ginger is famous for its healing properties. It’s often used to treat digestion, nausea, and cold and flu symptoms. This is because of an antioxidant called gingerol which can help reduce oxidative stress. Ginger also has anti-inflammatory effects which can be helpful when treating many chronic illnesses such as arthritis, heart disease, certain cancers, and general joint and muscle pain. In addition to its anti-inflammatory effects, ginger has been seen to have anticancer activity. This means that ginger may be a preventative and therapeutic ingredient when dealing with cancer growth and development. This powerful plant can be used for its zesty and warm flavour, as well as its many healing benefits. You… Read More


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Food and Recipe of the Month: Pumpkin Gnocchi

Care of Andrea Howe, of glowingongreens.com  When we think of pumpkins, we usually picture it as an October staple served at Thanksgiving, or on our porches for Halloween. However, pumpkins in November are just as acceptable before we make the transition to winter months. Pumpkins are part of the winter squash family, along with spaghetti, acorn, and butternut squash. Its hearty and rich flavour can be used in a variety of recipes including sauces, lattés, or blended into doughs. This versatile vegetable is not only good for autumn recipes, but for its exquisite nutritional profile. Pumpkins get their bright orange colouring from a nutrient called beta-carotene. Our bodies convert beta-carotene to vitamin A, which is an antioxidant that plays a role in reducing the risk for cancer, Alzheimer’s, and heart disease. Vitamin A is also famous for its benefits to our skin. It can fight free radicals which can contribute to aging, skin damage, and fine-lines. Pumpkin is also low in calories and high in fibre. This means that it is a staple ingredient to be used when trying to lose weight. Fibre helps the body feel full for longer while maintaining healthy blood sugar levels. Fibre also plays a… Read More


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Food and Recipe of the Month: Basil Pesto

Basil – the famous herb which is likely in everyone’s vegetable garden in the summertime. Basil is known for its fresh and flavourful taste, and is popular in many recipes in Italian and Thai cuisine. The two most common variaties of basil are Genovese basil and Thai basil, however there are well over 15 types. Basil is rich in many vitamins and minerals that can greatly benefit our health. It contains antioxidants, including chlorophyll, giving it that bright green colour. Antioxidants are able to fight free-radical damage, and reduce the risk of cancer cells and diseases from forming. Basil also contains essential oils, which are anti-inflammatory, so it may be beneficial for those with arthritis, heart disease, or type 2 diabetes. Its anti-inflammatory properties may also be helpful for those who experience headaches, poor digestion, or acid reflux. Not only does it contain these powerful nutrients, but it can also be used as a flavour enhancer in cooking, replacing added sugar or salt. Therefore, using basil in your cooking can reduce the amount of unnecessary additional seasoning. Basil can be used in a variety of dishes, including salads, soups, sauces, and tea. It’s most popular use is in pesto,… Read More


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Food and Recipe of the Month: Black Beans

Care of Andrea Howe of glowingongreens.com Beans are certainly a magical fruit due to their nutritional content, but especially the black bean, being a popular legume used all around the world. It can be found in Mexican cuisine, veggie burgers, chilies, and more. Its significance may be deceiving, because even though it’s small, it is packed full of important nutrients. Black beans are famous for their fibre content. Fibre can help regulate stools, lower blood sugars and weight, as well as decrease the risk of heart disease and various cancers including bowel, colon, breast, and prostate. Just one cup of black beans contains 15g of fibre, which is half of your recommended daily intake. Black beans are also full of vitamins, specifically B vitamins. These vitamins, including thiamin and niacin are important for growth and development in children, as well as for our brain health. Finally, black beans are a great source of plant-based protein, as well as rich in iron, with about 4 grams of iron in every cup. This makes them an important ingredient for vegetarians/vegans, women, and infants. The soft texture makes them a great snack for infants, but make sure to add a little lemon juice… Read More


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Food and Recipe of the Month: Spinach

Care of Andrea Howe, of glowingongreens.com  Spinach, a favourable leafy green, is famous for being packed full of non-heme iron, as well as shrinking down into almost nothing when cooked. This vegetable is unique as its mild flavour can be incorporated into almost every type of dish, from smoothies and green pancakes, to pasta and salads. Not only is it impressively versatile, but it comes with an abundance of nutrients. Spinach is an excellent source of iron, which is especially important for infants, pregnant women and breast-feeding mothers, and those not eating meat. Iron travels in the blood attached to hemoglobin to help deliver oxygen around the body. It is best absorbed with vitamin C, so add a little lemon or lime juice over your spinach salad for maximum nutrient benefits. Spinach is also packed with potassium, magnesium, vitamin K, and calcium, which are all important nutrients for strong bone health. These nutrients can strengthen bone density and reduce fractures, especially in older adults and women over the age of 50. Spinach loses volume when wilted and condenses, which is the best way to maximize the benefits of these nutrients. Spinach can be found in various forms, such as… Read More


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Food and Recipe of the Month: Cilantro Lime Taco Sauce

Care of Andrea Howe, of glowingongreens.com Cilantro, also known as coriander, is an herb many people love or hate due to its particular flavour. Cilantro are the leaves and stem of the plant, and are commonly found in Mexican dishes, while the seed, commonly found in Indian dishes, is named coriander. However, all parts of it can be incorporated into a variety of dishes including soups, salads, and sauces. Cilantro, along with many herbs, are packed full of antioxidants. These immune-boosting components are known to fight damage and inflammation in the body, from viruses, pollution, smoke, and other free-radicals. Antioxidants neutralize and repair the damage, helping reduce risks of cancer formation, as well as slow the growth of existing cancer cells. Along with their free-radical fighting abilities, coriander contains antimicrobial compounds which have been seen in studies to fight certain infections such as salmonella, and urinary tract infections. Additionally, coriander appears to act as diuretic, helping the body flush excess sodium and water which can lower blood pressure and levels of LDL cholesterol. In populations that consume large amounts of coriander, heart disease rates tend to be lower. So, next time your cilantro-hating friends and family members doubt… Read More


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