elifelines

Cream of Kale Soup

    Care of Amy Symington Ingredients  1 tbsp oil 1 large onion, diced 1 leek (white parts only), diced 4 garlic cloves, minced 3 tbsp fresh ginger, chopped 1 small head of cauliflower, greens removed, chopped 1 small celeriac root, diced 1 tsp ground coriander 1 tsp ground cumin 6 cups water 5 cups kale, chopped – you can include stems here too if you’d like 1 lemon juiced, seeds removed 1 cup unsweetened milk alternative 1 tsp sea salt Black pepper to taste Directions  In a large stock pot over medium heat add oil. Once heated add onion, leek, garlic and ginger. Sauté until fragrant, about 3 minutes. Next add cauliflower and celeriac root and sauté for another 3 minutes. Add coriander and cumin and sauté until fragrant, about 3 minutes. Add water and stir. Allow water to come to a boil and let boil for 5 minutes. Next add kale and incorporate until it is fully wilted. Very carefully, either using a blender or hand immersion blender puree the soup completely. Now add lemon juice, milk, salt and pepper. Taste and adjust seasoning with salt and pepper if needed. Serve and garnish with cilantro (if… Read More


Filed under: Eat Veg elifelines Vegan & Vegetarian Recipes

Holy Kale

Care of Amy Symington Kale, or borecole, is a cousin of the wild cabbage family, a buddy to your taste buds and mother approved as part of a well balanced diet. To put it plainly, unless you have been avoiding all forms of nutrition news over the past decade, you know that Kale is the new “apple a day” and with so many good reasons why. For starters, it is crammed with calcium. Yes calcium. On a gram to gram basis, kale’s calcium content is more bioavailable than cow’s milk (Heaney, R.P., 1990; Kamchan, A. et al., 2004). Other health superstars contained in kale include thiamin, riboflavin, folate, iron, magnesium and phosphorus. We’re not done yet. Kale is also a VERY good source of vitamin C, vitamin K, vitamin B6, potassium, copper, manganese and lutein. Lutein, which is found in dark leafy greens, is believed by scientists today to assist in the reduction of age-related blindness (Geissler, C., 2010). And holy fibre! This is what people like to refer to as a natural Gastro Intestinal scrubber. Shall we go on? Ok. It’s also a fantastic way to add some additional protein to your diet as well as simultaneously top up… Read More


Filed under: Eat Veg elifelines Food of the Month Nutrition

Radish, Fennel and Carrot Cakes

Care of Amy Symington Makes 18 small cakes Ingredients:  2 cups ground oats or spelt flour 1 cup carrots grated 1 cup fennel thinly sliced 1 cup radishes grated 1 cup water 1/4 cup dill chopped 1 tbsp ground flax seeds 1 tbsp paprika 2 tsp ground coriander 2 tsp lemon zest 1.5 tsp coarse sea salt 1 tsp kelp powder (optional) Pepper to taste 2 tbsp oil (for sautéing) Garnish: Lemony hummus, cucumbers, dill Directions: Preheat oven to 200°C to keep cooked cakes warm while the others are sautéing. In a big bowl, mix all the ingredients together excluding the oil. Let sit for 10 minutes to allow the batter to thicken. Meanwhile over medium heat, heat a large sauté pan. Add 2 tsp of the oil. Using a tablespoon scoop out batter and place a heaping spoonful on to the pan. Repeat 6 times. Allow to sauté until golden brown, about 7 minutes. Flip and press cakes to flatten them. They should be approximately 2.5-3 inches in diameter. Allow to sauté until golden brown, about 7 minutes. Remove from pan and store in oven to keep hot. Repeat, sautéing 6 cakes per batch until all the batter… Read More


Filed under: Eat Veg elifelines Vegan & Vegetarian Recipes

Totally RADish

Care of Amy Symington Often pushed to the back of the veggie platter, the radish is actually one rad cruciferous vegetable that deserves a little more credit and recognition, so listen up. Radishes come in almost every colour of the rainbow from yellow to red to purple, and the types and uses vary all over the globe.  The most commonly used radish in North American is the red radish; Asian countries are known for their diakon usage, also referred to as Chinese or Japanese radish and/or Mooli; Scandinavians lovvve them some Plum Purple radish; and the Sicily Giant radish, is from, you guessed it, Sicily.  Radishes can be found year round and every season brings different varieties. With that said, come springtime radishes are among the first veggies to be happily harvested.  So happy harvest to you! Radishes, particularly red and purple radishes, are rich in the antioxidant anthocyanin.  This may increase free radical fighting properties, which can decrease chronic inflammatory diseases such as fibrocystic disease, cancer, type 2 diabetes and various neurological illnesses.  In addition to reducing inflammation, anthocyanins may also ward off nasty bacterial infections. Radishes are an excellent source of vitamin C, a good source of folate… Read More


Filed under: Eat Veg elifelines Food of the Month Nutrition

Discount Profile: M and B Yummy

Care of Chris Ekbatani A group of vegans chose M & B Yummy as our spot for a meetup back in January. That Friday night was a delightful experience. I must say that this restaurant is one of Toronto’s best kept veggie secrets! The authentic African cuisine is bound to turn one’s palate on, and if your experience with the hostess and wait staff is anything like mine, then you will be sure to enjoy every moment of your interaction in that space. When I arrived it was a chilly winter evening, the resto was warm with pleasant lighting, comfy seating, and a nice hot tea served fresh for me. There are so many savoury dishes to try, but we were lucky to have several already prepared, and soon after getting there, dinner was served. The atmosphere of the place was just vibrant, and even those not so keen on spicy foods can appreciate the genuine Ethiopian tastes with every bite. It was my first time there but most certainly not the last! Check out this piping hot spot on Queen West and you’ll be sure to take pleasure in their plant-based menu, desserts to die for, and… Read More


Filed under: Discount profiles elifelines

Roasted Mushroom and Barley Salad

Serves 8 Spring is kind of unpredictable weather-wise, so I went with a variety of tastes, textures and flavours in this salad to satisfy throughout the season. You can change up the vegetables/herbs with whatever inspires you in the moment. Ingredients 1 cup pot barley, soaked overnight 12 ounces mushrooms, sliced (I used cremini and oyster varieties) 2 leeks (white and light green part only) 3 sprigs of thyme, leaves removed and chopped fine ½ tbsp tamari soy sauce 1 tbsp balsamic vinegar 5 tbsp grapeseed oil, divided juice of 1 lemon ⅓ cup raw hazelnuts 1 small shallot, minced fine ¾ cup chopped flat leaf parsley salt and pepper   Directions Preheat oven to 400 degrees F. Line one large and one small baking sheet with parchment paper and set aside. Drain the soaked barley over a bowl to save the water. Place drained barley in a medium saucepan. Top up the barley water with fresh water (if necessary) up to 3 cups. Place saucepan over medium heat and bring to a boil. Lower pot to a simmer, cover and cook until barley grains are fully cooked, but still a little bit chewy, about 25 minutes. Drain… Read More


Filed under: Eat Veg elifelines Vegan & Vegetarian Recipes

Beautiful Barley

Care of Laura Wright Barley is the oldest domesticated grain in the entire world. It’s been cultivated for ten thousand years! This nutty, chewy, satisfying food is delicious in so many ways. Typically enjoyed in soups throughout the colder months, its heartiness fortifies and warms us up. Definitely an economical and nutritional superstar on that front. Its application isn’t limited to soup alone though. You can add soaked barley to your steel cut oats for a little variation, make it risotto style for a classy dinner, grind it into flour for a fibre boost in your cookies or toss it into a lovely grain salad like I’ve done in the recipe below. Pot vs Pearl: You will generally find two types of barley available in stores. If you are concerned about health properties and prefer whole grains in your diet, reach for the “pot” variety. These grains have only had their tough, outer husk removed. While pearl barley certainly cooks faster, it lacks the nutrition of the grain in its whole form because an additional two layers (the bran and endosperm) are polished off. You may also appreciate the more pronounced toasted and nutty flavour that pot barley has to… Read More


Filed under: Eat Veg elifelines Food of the Month Nutrition

Gingwer Maple Baked Aduki Beans

Care of Amy Symington Try this sweet and savoury rendition of an old classic. Serves 4     Ingredients: 1 tsp oil (canola or olive oil will do) 1 small onion, diced 4 cloves garlic, pureed 2 tbsp fresh ginger, minced 2 ½ cups aduki beans, cooked (approx. 2 cans) ½ cup tomato puree ¼ cup + 1 tbsp maple syrup 1 tbsp veg friendly Worcestershire sauce 1 cup water 1-½ tsp paprika ¼ tsp cayenne (optional) 2 tsp fresh lemon juice ½ tsp coarse sea salt Black pepper to taste Garnish: garlic chive micro-greens (optional) Directions: In a large sauce pan over medium heat add oil. Once the oil is heated, add onions and sauté for 1 minute. Add garlic and ginger. Sauté until fragrant, about 1 minute. Add the beans, tomato puree, ¼ cup of maple syrup, Worcestershire sauce, water, paprika, and cayenne, if using. Stir and place the lid on the pan. Turn heat to medium-low and simmer for 20 minutes, stirring occasionally. Next, add lemon juice, the remaining maple syrup, sea salt and black pepper to taste. Stir, plate and top with garnish. Serve with whole grain bread or toast. Read More


Filed under: Eat Veg elifelines Vegan & Vegetarian Recipes

Maplelous!

Care of Amy Symington What is more Canadian than maple syrup? A thick Quebecois accent, eager beavers, veggie poutine and Canadian Club whisky may all give it a run for its loonies but maple syrup is recognized globally as liquid Canadian candy.  Fact. The Process The province of Quebec alone is responsible for ¾ of the world’s maple syrup sales. The best part? It is a renewable resource that comes from trees. It’s not often that you can say that. The more trees, the more maple syrup too! As they all have equally high starch/sugar content, the 3 main types of trees that are used for maple syrup production or “tapping” as it’s referred to in the industry are:  Sugar Maple, Black Maple and Red Maple. Once they have grown to be 12 inches in diameter, the trees are ready to be tapped every year. Late March to early April is the typical maple syrup season. Like other processes in spring, things thaw and tree sap is no different. As the sap begins to thaw, it also begins to run. This tends to last about 4-6 weeks and is collected either via an “old school” bucket or an… Read More


Filed under: Eat Veg elifelines Food of the Month Nutrition

Discount Profile: Cruda Cafe

Care of Angela Del Buono If you’ve never been to the St. Lawrence Market, it can be a bustling and often overwhelming place. Vegetarians are advised to stick to the lower level and forgo the sight of carcasses. But once you reach the lower level you can enjoy organic produce and bulk foods at Dominos, beans and rice at Rubes, and organic, hand-made tofu at Ying Ying, but don’t head home yet.. the best is still to come. In the North-East corner you’ll find Cruda Cafe, an all vegan & raw cafe that will dazzle your palate. They offer juices & smoothies, Rawraps  (my favourite of which is the Sundried Tomato Wrap; seasonal veggies, organic raw pate, avocado and sunflower sprouts), salads and entrees like Sweet Potato Mesquite Sandwich (slices of their dehydrated bread, homemade guacamole, seasonal veggies, homemade vegan kombucha cheese.) Don’t forget dessert! So many treats, my favourite of which is the pictured Mint Nainamo Bar. Head down Saturday morning for brunch items. Seating is food-court style with lots of great people watching. Use your Toronto Veg Card for 10% off everything, including their Un-Cooking Classes. Discount: 10% off with the Toronto… Read More


Filed under: Discount profiles elifelines