elifelines

Discount Profile” Shop ‘Til You Drop at Panacea

  Go Max Go Bars at Pancea, photo care of weblocal.ca Yes, it’s true that we’ve spoken about Panacea before, but a recent trip to this vegan wonderland meant we couldn’t resist telling you about our most recent visit. Every time you go to Panacea it’s like stepping into a new store – they are constantly stocking new products and moving things around to make space for more and more plant-based products. Panacea is more than just a natural food store – it’s Toronto’s first and only all vegan grocery store. For anyone that opts for a plant-based diet, there’s no way to describe the burden lifted off your shoulders when you walk into a store and can freely pick whatever your heart desires from the shelves, without having to read any labels. And although that might sound dangerous to anyone watching their spending, there is of course the bonus that with your Toronto Veg Card you’ll get 5% off your purhcases! So what were some of the latest surprises we found on our last trip to Panacea? A wide selection of those decadent Go Max Go Bars (yes, the chocolate bars that replicate name brands like Mars and… Read More


Filed under: Discount profiles elifelines

Raw South Asian Date Balls

Care of Amy Symington        Ingredients:  3/4 cup raw cashews 10 medjool dates 3 tbsp shredded unsweetened coconut 1 tbsp orange zest 2 tbsp agave or maple syrup 1/2 tsp cinnamon 1/4 tsp cardamom Directions:  Make certain all pits are removed from dates. Place all ingredients into a food processor and process until it becomes a firm dough, about 2 minutes. Remove sticky dough and form into bite size balls by rolling between your hands. Roll in extra coconut for garnish (if desired) or leave as is.      Refrigerate for 15-20 minutes before serving to allow the balls to firm up. Makes 10-12 balls. Read More


Filed under: Eat Veg elifelines Vegan & Vegetarian Recipes

Food of the Month: Cinnamonful

Care of Amy Symington  Surely something this good must be bad for you? Not in this super spice’s case. Smoothies, pancakes, nuts, curry, Moroccan stew, jerked tofu, rolls, sticky buns, puddings, and tea – cinnamon is the master of all things spiced. It has a sharp and spicy, but woody, sweet aroma and flavour that is used worldwide in almost every culture on our great planet. Whether it is sweet or savoury cuisine, cinnamon plays no favourites and can star in or simply enhance appetizers, entrees, sides or dismal desserts alike. Besides being the most infamous spice for its potent characteristics, cinnamon has a grocery list long of health benefits. It is filled to the brim with antioxidants, anti-inflammatory and weight loss powers.  Ka-pow! One teeny teaspoon of this ground glory has the equivalent antioxidant level to that of ½ cup of nutritiously acclaimed blueberries, helping to keep evil diseases at bay. Its anti-inflammatory properties also ward off serious ailments such as Alzheimer’s and heart disease while simultaneously combating annoyances like pesky allergies and pain or stiffness in muscles and joints. Studies have shown cinnamon and other super spices in a heroic light, testifying that they promote satiety and the… Read More


Filed under: Eat Veg elifelines Food of the Month Nutrition

Animal Advocacy: Ducklover Bonnie (aka: Bonnie Shulman)

  Bonnie’s beloved ducks Brownie and Greenie. Care of Nelson Carvalho Bonnie Shulman is a member of the TVA, former eLifelines columnist (Animal Profile of the Month) and a colleague of mine at the Workplace Safety and Insurance Board (WSIB). You can easily tell that she’s a vegan by the massive number of Farm Sanctuary posters on her cubicle walls. She’s a frequent donor to that organization and to many other organizations that promote veganism. Bonnie is well known here in the Communications Division for her veganism and love of animals, particularly ducks. In fact, she tells me that it was after making her first duck friend that she went vegan.   Bonnie has developed such personal relationships with some of them that she can call them by name, and they respond. Last June, Bonnie rescued a family of ducklings from a well. You can see the video here. She keeps a close eye on the ducks in the High Park Zoo, and noticed a duck who needed special care before the zookeepers did. The Pekin Duck hen was haggard and her feathers were in disarray, suggesting overmating by other residents of the duck pen. Bonnie waited hours… Read More


Filed under: Animal Advocacy Community elifelines

Kamut Linguine in Bechemel Sauce

Care of Amy Symington        Ingredients Pasta (or use store bought whole wheat pasta to save some time!) 2-1/2 cup Kamut flour + extra for rolling Pinch salt 1 cup cold water 2 tsp olive oil Combine flour and salt in large bowl. Make a well in center. Add cold water and olive oil. Knead until dough is smooth.  Cover with wet cloth until ready to use.  When ready, divide dough in half and roll out to ½” thickness. Use extra flour to prevent sticking. Thinly slice into noodles. Repeat with other ball.  Place all noodles into a pot of boiling water. Cook until el dente. Drain. Set aside. Sauce 530g package soft organic tofu ¾ cup unsalted cashews ½ cup nutritional yeast 4 cloves garlic 1 tbsp oil 1 tbsp whole wheat flour 1 cup water 3/4 cup fresh herbs, chopped (dill, thyme, tarragon recommended) Zest of 1 lemon Pinch salt Directions: In a food processor add tofu, cashews, nutritional yeast and garlic. Process until smooth. Set aside. Over medium heat in a large sauté pan add oil and flour (making a roux). Whisk together until smooth. Add tofu mixture to roux. Whisk. Add water and… Read More


Filed under: Eat Veg elifelines Vegan & Vegetarian Recipes

Food of the Month: Nutritional Yeast

Care of Amy Symington No, nutritional yeast won’t make your bread rise or your home brew taste better, but its uses and nutritional benefits are absolutely nothing to sneeze at.   What is Nutritional Yeast? For those of you who haven’t been privy to the existence of what should be referred to as the veghead’s best friend, nutritional yeast is a derivative of yeast combined with a cocktail of sugarcane and beet molasses that has been fermented for a period of one week. After which, it is then harvested, washed, dried on roller drum dryers and packaged for sale. It is available in either flake or a powder form and can be located in most health and bulk food stores. What does it taste like!? It has a strong nutty, and creamy flavour that makes it perfect for the concocting of cheese substitutes. The flakes or powder simply disintegrate into or amalgamate with whatever they are sprinkled on to, poured over or stirred into, enhancing any savoury snack or meal alike. Besides taste, what’s in it for me? Nutritional yeast is good for you. It is a complete protein and is a very good source of dietary fibre as well… Read More


Filed under: Eat Veg elifelines Food of the Month Nutrition

Animal Advocacy: Toronto Pig Save

Know someone you want to nominate for the Animal Advocacy Profile? Tell us about someone in the community doing inspiring work for animals.   Photo care of Susan Morris Toronto Pig Save: Giving Slaughterhouses Windows Care of Anita Kranjc Nobel laureate John Coetzee has his protagonist in the self-titled novel, Elizabeth Costello, give a university lecture on “The Philosophers and the Animals.” She tells her audience: “‘I was taken on a drive around Waltham this morning. It seems a pleasant enough town. I saw no horrors, no drug-testing laboratories, no factory farms, no abattoirs. Yet I am sure they are here. They must be. They simply do not advertise themselves. They are all around us as I speak, only we do not, in a certain sense, know about them.” The slaughterhouses are here in Toronto, too – downtown and in the outskirts.      Art by Sue Coe   Quality Meat Packers (QMP) is located in the downtown core, off King and Bathurst, at 2 Tecumseh. You get a good panoramic view of the colossal QMP industrial complex if you stand on the hills of Fort York and direct your gaze across the railway lines. Walking with… Read More


Filed under: Animal Advocacy Community elifelines

Discount Profile: Loving Hut

Care of Jason Doucette   Fried wontons from Loving Hut Those of you who have seen the cover of the 2011 Vegetarian Directory might be interested to know that several of the photos are of food from Loving Hut, thanks to the photography skills of Jennifer from SweetOnVeg.com. They’re actually from a British Columbia location, and until recently your stalwart Vegetarian Directory team hadn’t had a chance to try out the Toronto restaurant at 953 Eglinton Ave W. That was recently remedied! The lunch featured nugget dumplings, crispy noodles with TVP and veggies, and classic tofu and eggplant in black bean sauce, while the two babies in attendance enjoyed yummy maki rolls in their high chairs (we found the Eglinton location to be very baby friendly!) The meal came to about $25 per adult with tip, thanks to the 10% discount available through the Toronto Veg Card. For those afraid to venture North of Bloor, Loving Hut has just opened a new location at Spadina and Richmond, which also accepts the Toronto Veg Card! Veg Status? Vegetarian Savings with Toronto Veg Card: 10% off Location: 953 Eglinton Avenue West… Read More


Filed under: Discount profiles elifelines

Flax Pumpkin Cookies

Care of Andrea Gourgy       Ingredients:  3/4 cup whole-wheat flour 3/4 cup all-purpose white flour 2 tbsp flax seeds 2 tsp allspice 2 tsp cinnamon 1 tsp ginger 1 tsp baking powder 1 tsp baking soda 1/4 tsp nutmeg 1/8 tsp sea salt 3/4 cup brown sugar 2/3 cup coconut oil 1/2 cup canned pumpkin puree 1/4 cup ground flax 1/3 cup water 1 tsp vanilla extract 1/2 cup raisins Directions:  Preheat oven to 350 °F (180 °C).  In a large bowl, whisk together whole-wheat flour, all-purpose white flour, flax seeds, allspice, cinnamon, ginger, baking powder, baking soda, nutmeg and sea salt. In a second bowl, whisk together brown sugar, coconut oil, pumpkin puree, flax meal, water and vanilla. Stir the wet ingredients into the dry ingredients until combined. Stir in raisins. Using your hands, form into balls and flatten on prepared baking sheets. Bake until cookies are firm and lightly golden (about 10 minutes). Makes about 30 cookies. Read More


Filed under: Eat Veg elifelines Vegan & Vegetarian Recipes

Food of the Month: Fun with Flax Seeds

Care of Andrea Gourgy Flax has garnered a lot of media attention recently, and rightly so, as its nutritional properties are said to protect against everything from cancer to heart disease and stroke. But while its popularity may be a recent phenomenon, flax has actually been around for thousands of years. Also known as linseed, flax was cultivated in Babylon way back in 3000 BC and Hippocrates, the father of medicine around 650 BC, wrote about flax for the relief of abdominal pain. Nowadays, Canada leads the world’s flax production with thousands of acres of land in the prairies dedicated to growing flax. Flax seeds contain about 42 percent oil, and more than half of that oil is omega-3 fatty acid (alpha-linolenic fatty acid or ALA). Evidence suggests that omega-3 fatty acids can protect against heart disease, stroke, hypertension and even autoimmune disorders. Vegetarians and vegans are at particular risk for deficiencies in omega-3 fatty acids (after all, the most common source of omega-3 fatty acids for omnivores is fish). Flax, as a plant-based source of omega-3, can play an important role in vegetarian and vegan diets. Flax also contains phytoestrogens called lignans that, in animal studies, have shown to… Read More


Filed under: Eat Veg elifelines Food of the Month Nutrition