Eat Veg

Discount Profile: Away Kitchen and Cafe

Care of Barbi Lazarus Walking into Away Kitchen and Cafe in Little Italy is like walking into a garden, with living walls and a bright, airy decor. But before sitting down we wandered up to the counter to place our order and see what pastries were on hand that day. From the menu, my partner and I ordered the sweet potato empanada, and two sandwiches: lemongrass seitan and a pulled “pork” style sandwich made from king oyster mushrooms. The filling of the empanada was just sweet enough with a delicious, warm crust. The sandwiches were both delightful yet totally different from one another! The lemongrass seitan sandwich was light and refreshing, with cold, chopped carrot and daikon, while the pulled mushroom sandwich had a delicious BBQ sauce and was warm and hearty. We couldn’t resist grabbing a couple of items from the case. First up was a quiche, whose pastry was so perfect, flaky and light. And to top it all off was dessert: a beet cake which was incredibly moist and soft, without being overly sweet. With a new patio, and YamChops pretty much right across the street, do yourself a favour and make an afternoon to Little Italy your next weekend jaunt. Read More


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Food of the Month: Artichokes in Caesar Potato Salad

Care of Amy Symington at ameliaeats.com  Although somewhat intimidating in appearance, artichokes are one of the friendliest vegetables you can consume! They are rich in inulin fibre, which aids in reducing one’s overall risk of cardiovascular disease by helping to reduce LDL cholesterol levels in the blood and consequently avoid the build up of harmful plaque in your arteries. Moreover, they are rich in potassium which aids in regulating blood pressure, further increasing their heart health benefits. They are also high in polyphenols, rutin, quercetin, and vitamin C, which are antioxidants directly linked to a reduced risk of cancer. Lastly, they are high in fibre in general, which is an important component of any healthy diet that wishes to focus on preventing diseases like obesity, diabetes, heart disease, and cancer. If the health benefits don’t intrigue you, they are also a distinctive and versatile vegetable that will help to add a unique taste and texture to any soup, salad or entrée! Try our summer inspired Potato Caesar Salad below and see what the addition of artichokes can make! Bon Appetit! Potato Caesar Salad Makes 8 servings (1 cup/serving) Preparation Time: 25 minutes Cook Time: 30-35 minutes… Read More


Filed under: Eat Veg elifelines Food of the Month News Nutrition Vegan & Vegetarian Recipes

Discount Profile: Brunch at Vegan Danish Bakery

Care of Barbi Lazarus This isn’t the first time we’ve raved about the beautiful and delicious offerings at the Vegan Danish Bakery in Thornhill, but just when you thought it couldn’t get any better, they’ve launched a brand new brunch menu available Sundays from 10:30 am to 5 pm. The first thing you notice when you walk into the Vegan Danish Bakery may not be the spectacular case of classically decorated treats, but the gorgeous and calming decor. The Vegan Danish Bakery is a bright, fancy, meticulous space with comfortable, spacious seating. Glancing at the menu, we were overwhelmed by the mix of sweet and savoury offerings, such as the ham and cheese quiche, apple cinnamon toast, and the giant viking plate that comes with sausage, scrambled “eggs”, waffles, a biscuit, and potatoes. I was intrigued by the numerous Danish waffles I had not heard of before. With three flavour options to choose from, I was lucky that my mom wanted to share and split two different kinds! We had the Jordbærgrød (Danish strawberry dessert) and the Æblegrød (Danish apple dessert), and words simply can not describe how decadent, sweet and delicious they were. The portions were extremely… Read More


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Food & Recipe of the Month: Oil-Free Onion Rings

Care of Andrea Howe, of glowingongreens.com  Onions may not be something to cry over after all! A member of the allium family, these vegetables have been consumed for centuries due to their rich flavours and medicinal properties. Onions can be incorporated into almost every savoury dish for a boost of flavour, colour, and health benefits. They have been linked to cancer prevention, especially stomach and colorectal due to being rich in organosulfur compounds. Additionally, they contain vitamin C which is an antioxidant that prevents free radical damage. Studies show that men with the highest intake of allium vegetables had a lower risk of prostate cancer, potentially due to its high antioxidant and fibre levels. Along with these amazing benefits, onions contain folate which may help reduce depression. It aids in blood and nutrients to flow to the brain and release of serotonin, dopamine, and norepinephrine. So, onions will not only taste delicious, but they’ll make you feel amazing! Oil-Free Onion Rings Ingredients: – 2 large yellow onions – ½ cup flour – 2/3 cup non-dairy milk – ½ tsp paprika – ½ tsp garlic powder – ½ tsp salt – 1 cup bread crumbs… Read More


Filed under: Eat Veg elifelines Food of the Month News News from the Toronto Vegetarian Association Nutrition Uncategorised Vegan & Vegetarian Recipes

Food and Recipe of the Month: Garlic Chives

Care of Amy Symington at ameliaeats.com  As the Spring weather approaches so does our excitement for fresh produce. Spring herbs like garlic chives are not only a nice fresh and flavourful treat after a long, cold, root vegetable-laden winter, but they are also beneficial to us health wise. Garlic chives are abundant in folate, riboflavin, calcium, potassium, iron, and the antioxidant rich vitamins A and C. Aside from being nutrient dense, they are also a good source of dietary fibre, helping to regulate blood sugar levels, maintain a healthy body weight, and keep chronic diseases at bay. It is the perfect time of year to clear out the proverbial old cobwebs and that goes for our eating habits as well. Introduce more flavourful plant-based ingredients into your regular diet in lieu of added fat, salt, and sugar, and you will be certain to put a little more spring into your step this Spring. Chive and macadamia nut pesto Makes 6 servings (2 tsp/serving) Preparation Time: 10 minutes Ingredients: 1 bunch chives (approximately 30g) ½ cup macadamia nuts 2 tbsp nutritional yeast… Read More


Filed under: Eat Veg elifelines Food of the Month Front page post News News from the Toronto Vegetarian Association Uncategorised Vegan & Vegetarian Recipes

Food and Recipe of the Month: Cashews

Care of Amy Symington at ameliaeats.com  If you lead a mostly plant based diet, you are very familiar with the versatility of the cashew nut. Creamy, sweet, savoury, spicy, and salty – the possibilities are actually endless. The good news is that cashews as part of a whole-foods, plant-based diet are also beneficial to your health! Cashews, along with all nuts, contain heart healthy, monounsaturated fatty acids and high levels of beneficial antioxidants that have been shown to significantly reduce one’s risk of coronary heart disease if consumed regularly (Kelly and Sabate, 2006). Cashews are an excellent source of copper which aids in bone and connective tissue health, and a good source of magnesium which aids in muscle relaxation, manganese, an important component found in antioxidants, and zinc, which boosts our immune system and aids in digestion. It is important to ensure that your cashews and cashew butter are kept dry in a tightly sealed container in the refrigerator to avoid rancidity. So, for good health enjoy those cashews (among other nuts) toasted in your favourite trail mix, as a creamy dairy free mac and cheese sauce, atop your morning parfait, or in a treat like these Cinnamon Bun Cookies!… Read More


Filed under: Eat Veg elifelines Food of the Month News Nutrition Uncategorised Vegetarian Holiday Recipes

Sindy Says: Grounding Foods and Warming Spices for Winter

Care of Sindy Ng, nutritionist in Toronto The weather is getting cooler as the months go by, and I’m sure many of us shift our eating habits along with the seasons. Long, cold winters can pose challenges for some who want to maintain a vegan lifestyle, but there’s lots of foods we can still enjoy. Bananas are widely available year-round and are a staple for me. Enjoy them as a snack on their own, in your smoothies, muffins, pancakes, and so much more! Sweet potatoes, potatoes, and winter squash are also easy to find in the winter. I love incorporating these vegetables into soups or baked goods, and who doesn’t love a warming soup in the winter? Potatoes, sweet potatoes and winter squash contain high amounts of the antioxidant beta-carotene, which is responsible for the bright red and orange colour of many fruits and vegetables. Beta-carotene is converted into vitamin A in the body. This nutrient has been shown to protect cells against oxidative damage, as well as help to prevent certain cancers, cataracts, heart disease, and age-related macular degeneration. Potatoes are a good source of vitamin A and C. Potatoes are by far… Read More


Filed under: Eat Veg News News from the Toronto Vegetarian Association Nutrition Uncategorised

Vegan cooking for the holidays

Care of Florence McCambridge Whether this is your first time cooking a vegan meal for the holidays or you’re just looking for some new menu ideas, The Vegan Holiday Cookbook: From Elegant Appetizers to Festive Mains and Delicious Sweets 
by Marie Laforêt has got you covered. It’s full of recipes and full-colour photos for spreads and hors d’oeuvres, soups and mains, not to mentions sweets and even festive cocktails. Many of the recipes included in this book are gluten-free, and the author has also included a helpful section listing them by category. I really appreciate the variety of recipes in The Vegan Holiday Cookbook, particularly in the section on appetizers, an often overlooked category that is particularly important at this time of year. Some standouts include the Foie Gras-Style Terrine made with shiitake mushrooms and tofu, the Blinis with Carrot Gravlax, and the elegant yet simple Squash Truffles. When it comes to dessert, this book does not disappoint. In addition to gingerbread and shortbread, there are some showstoppers like the Frozen Tiramisu Log, Chestnut Creme Brûlée, and a Snow White Layer Cake that looks almost too good to eat. I like to make my own… Read More


Filed under: Eat Veg News News from the Toronto Vegetarian Association Toronto Veg Blog Vegan & Vegetarian Cooking Tips Vegetarian Meal Ideas

Holiday Coleslaw with Orange Vinaigrette

Care of Amy Symington of ameliaeats.com Makes 5 servings, serving size: 1 cup (250ml) Ingredients Salad: 1 medium Bartlett pear, julienned 1 medium golden (or red) beet, julienned ½ small green cabbage, thinly sliced, approximately 3 cups ½ red onion, thinly sliced Dressing: 1 medium orange zested and juiced, approximately ¼ cup juice and 1 tbsp zest 3 tbsp apple cider vinegar 2 tbsp extra virgin olive oil 1 tsp djion mustard 1 tsp maple syrup ¼ tsp salt Garnish: ½ cup toasted hazelnuts, chopped 1/3 cup unsweetened cranberries 3 tbsp chopped parsley Directions In a large salad bowl, add all of the salad ingredients. In a small bowl, whisk together all dressing ingredients. Pour over salad and toss. Top with hazelnuts, cranberries, and parsley. Read More


Filed under: Eat Veg elifelines Food of the Month Front page post News Uncategorised Vegan & Vegetarian Recipes Vegetarian Holiday Recipes

Food of the Month: Cabbage

Care of Amy Symington, of ameliaeats.com Cabbages, cabbages, yum yum yum! Cabbage, a member of the cruciferous vegetable family, is a vegetable to make serious friends with. Cruciferous vegetables, in general, are full of fibre and phytochemicals, specifically sulphuric compounds that may reduce your risk of certain types of cancer, type 2 diabetes, as well as cardiovascular disease. Cabbage is also an excellent source of vitamin C and K. Although green is the most commonly consumed cabbage, red cabbage contains the antioxidant anthocyanin, which has nutritional perks such as providing anti-inflammatory benefits. In order to retain its maximum health benefits, raw, lightly steamed, or sauteed are the preferred cooking methods of cabbage. No matter how you slice it though, cabbage is one vegetable you won’t want to turn your nose up at. Read More


Filed under: Eat Veg elifelines Food of the Month Nutrition