Care of Amy Symington    

A descendant of the rose family, these tart and tasty little red bundles of goodness are once again in season! And it’s so easy to see why everyone loves their tangy yet mildly sweet flavour profile as it lends itself to endless dessert and even savoury possibilities.

Raspberries are an excellent source of manganese, vitamin C and dietary fibre and are a low glycemic food, aiding in the regulation of blood glucose levels.  They are rich in the flavonoid anthocyanin, which has been shown to have antioxidant/anti-inflammatory benefits, lowering oxidative stress present in the body. This in turn could potentially lower one’s overall risk of chronic disease. Raspberries also contain raspberry keytones. Raspberry keytones are the primary aroma compound found in raspberries and are used in perfumes and as flavouring agents in food products.

However, most recently they have been heavily marketed in the supplement world as the latest weight loss/fat burning miracle. With that said, currently, there is no conclusive, substantiated evidence to prove that this is in fact the case and it is not recommended to take raspberry keytone supplements to assist with weight issues.  The leaves from a raspberry bush are used to make delicious and fragrant teas and its flowers’ nectar is often a source of food for hungry honey bees.

Most commonly though you will see those big ruby red berries used in cakes, tarts, pies, and sauces or happily dipped in delicious dark chocolate. Consider this as your first warning of the season to stock up while the pickin’ is still good!